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Wedding Video - Pro Video UK

daz4421@icloud.com 07766 754944

Pro Video UK are wedding video specialist.  We can offer wedding video in Newbury and Wedding Video in Berkshire.

Not only can we film your wedding we also offer a service where you can film your own wedding and we edit all the footage to make a great film.

info@provideouk.co.uk 07766 754944

 

 

FIRST OF ALL...CONGRATULATIONS!  

Wedding Video Newbury

We have recently changed our packages with a more variety and choice of the style you love ! 

PLEASE VIST THE HOME PAGE FOR EXAMPLES AND THE PRICE LIST !  

 click here for HOMEPAGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newbury Wedding Video

info@provideouk.co.uk


Wedding Videography Newbury . whether you are looking for a videographer or wedding cinematography
they all mean the same thing only with lots of different names. They can also be called wedding films
but if you are after a videographer for wedding then read on.

We have made our wedding video services so they are want the customer needs for the best wedding video.
Most videos of weddings are based on quality and wedding videography prices and we love Newbury.

If you are looking for the best wedding videos in Newbury then you have come to the right place. We have over 25 years experience with wedding films. We have filmed a lot of wedding videos in Newbury.  Infact Wedding films in Newbury are a great place to have your wedding.

We have turned into more of a cinematic wedding video company in Newbury.

As far as the videographer goes we try if we can to keep kit and people down to keep discreet
for your wedding film.


For your wedding cinematography by the best wedding video business look no further.

We now deliver our wedding films in Newbury on USB and online as we are very aware wedding DVDs are
slowing fading for deliver. We try to make your wedding films future proof.

contact pro video UK for your videographer today in Newbury and lets make an awesome wedding film.

More about Newbury

Newbury /ˈnjuːbəri/ is a historic market town and the principal town in the west of Berkshire, England and has its own civil parish (led by a town council) as well as the administrative headquarters of West Berkshire. It spans both sides of the River Kennet and the Kennet and Avon Canal, and has a handsome town centre spread around its large market square.The historic town centre retains a rare medieval Cloth Hall and an adjoining half timbered granary, an unusually large 15th century parish church, along with a wealth of attractive 17th and 18th century listed buildings. Newbury is famous for its racecourse, and as the headquarters of Vodafone UK and software company Micro Focus International.

The town is located in the valley of the River Kennet, 26 miles (42 km) south of Oxford, 25 miles (40 km) north of Winchester, 27 miles (43 km) south east of Swindon and 20 miles (32 km) west of Reading. Newbury lies on the edge of the picturesque Berkshire Downs; part of the North Wessex Downs Area of outstanding natural beauty. It lies in south central West Berkshire, 3 miles (4.8 km) north of the Hampshire/ West Berkshire county boundary. In the suburban village of Donnington lies the part-ruined Donnington Castle and the surrounding hills are home to some of the country's most famous racehorse training grounds (centred on nearby Lambourn). To the south is a narrower range of hills including Walbury Hill and a few private landscape gardens and mansions such as Highclere Castle. The local economy is inter-related to that of the eastern M4 corridor, which has most of its industrial, logistical and research businesses close to Newbury, mostly around Reading, Bracknell, Maidenhead and Slough.

Together with the adjoining town of Thatcham, 3 miles (4.8 km) distant, Newbury forms the principal part of an Urban area of approximately 70,000 people.[2]

 

Contents

 

History

There was a Mesolithic settlement at Newbury. Artefacts were recovered from the Greenham Dairy Farm in 1963, and the Faraday Road site in 2002.[3] Additional material was found in excavations along the route of the Newbury Bypass.[4]

 

Part of the facade of Camp Hopson of Newbury, showing date 1663 and classical pilasters, in 2014.

Newbury was founded late in the 11th century following the Norman conquest as a new borough, hence its name. Although there are references to the borough that predate the Domesday Survey it is not mentioned by name in the survey. However, its existence within the manor of Ulvritone is evident from the massive rise in value of that manor at a time when most manors were worth less than in Saxon times. In 1086 the Domesday Book assesses the borough as having land for 12 ploughs, 2 mills, woodland for 25 pigs, 11 villeins (resident farmhands, unfree peasant who owed his lord labour services), 11 bordars (unfree peasants with less land than villans/villeins), and 51 enclosures (private parks) rendering 70s 7d.

Doubt has been cast over the existence of 'Newbury Castle', but the town did have royal connections and was visited a number of times by King John and Henry III while hunting in the area.[5]

Historically, the town's economic foundation was the cloth trade. This is reflected in the person of the 16th century cloth magnate, Jack of Newbury, the proprietor of what may well have been the first factory in England, and the later tale of the Newbury Coat. The latter was the outcome of a bet as to whether a gentleman's suit could be produced by the end of the day from wool taken from a sheep's back at the beginning. The local legend was later immortalized in a humorous novel by Elizabethan writer Thomas Deloney.

 

Donnington Castle

Newbury was the site of two battles during the English Civil War, the First Battle of Newbury (at Wash Common) in 1643, and the Second Battle of Newbury (at Speen) in 1644. The nearby Donnington Castle was reduced to a ruin in the aftermath of the second battle.

The disruption of trade during the civil war, compounded by a collapse of the local cloth trade in the late 16th century, left Newbury impoverished. The local economy was boosted in the 18th century by the rise of Bath as a popular destination for the wealthy escaping London's summer heat and associated stench. Newbury was roughly halfway between London and Bath and an obvious stopping point in the two-day journey. Soon Newbury, and the Speenhamland area in particular, was filled with coaching inns of ever increasing grandeur and size. One inn, the George & Pelican, was reputed to have stabling for 300 horses. A theatre was built to provide the travellers with entertainment featuring the major stars of the age. In 1795 local magistrates, meeting at the George and Pelican Inn in Speenhamland, introduced the Speenhamland System which tied parish poor relief (welfare payments) to the cost of bread.

 

The pedestrianised Northbrook Street

The opening of the Great Western Railway to the north of Newbury effectively killed the coaching trade. Having been approximately midway on the Bath Road from London, Newbury became something of a backwater market town, with an economy based largely on agriculture and horse-racing. In the 1980s, British electronics firm Racal decided to locate their newly formed telecommunications company Racal Vodafone (later Vodafone UK) in the town. In the subsequent decades Newbury became something of a regional centre for the high-tech industries, and the town has since enjoyed a return to general economic prosperity.

Greenham Common

Main article: RAF Greenham Common

 

Greenham Common in the late 80s

A large Royal Air Force station was established during the Second World War at Greenham Common on the edge of the town. In the 1950s, it became home to US Air Force bombers and tankers, for which it was equipped with the longest military runway in the United Kingdom. In the 1980s, it became one of only two USAF bases in the UK equipped with ground-launched nuclear-armed cruise missiles, causing it to become the site of protests by up to 40,000 protesters and the establishment of the Greenham Common Women's Peace Camp. With the end of the Cold War, the base was closed, the runway was broken up for use as fill material in building the Newbury bypass, and much of the area was restored to heathland.

Government

Newbury is part of, and the administrative centre of, the district administered by the unitary authority of West Berkshire which has a 2011 population of 153,822, an approximately straight-line increase of 15,022 since 1991.[6]

Newbury is also a civil parish, with parish council responsibilities undertaken by Newbury Town Council since 1997. Newbury Town Council currently has 23 councillors, representing seven wards of the town, currently: Brummel Grove, Clay Hill, Falkland, Northcroft, Pyle Hill, Victoria and St Johns. As of 2016, 6 of the councillors represent the Liberal Democrats and 17 represent the Conservative Party.[7]

In Parliament, the town is in the Newbury constituency. Since the election of May 2005 this constituency has been represented by Richard Benyon, a Conservative.

Newbury is twinned with Braunfels in Germany (1963), Bagnols-sur-Cèze in France (1970),[8] Eeklo in Belgium (1974) and Feltre in Italy (2003).

Since 1999 Newbury has formed part of the South East England European Parliament constituency electing MEPs by proportional representation.

Geography

 

View of Newbury and surroundings from Donnington Castle

The Civil Parish of Newbury consists of the town and the suburbs of Wash Common, the City, West Fields, East Fields and Speenhamland. The modern conurbation of Newbury, however, with close bus and road links and almost contiguous development, may be taken to include the surrounding villages of Speen, Donnington, Shaw and Greenham.[9]

Elevations vary from a minimum of 72m above mean sea level to 122m at Wash Common. Elevations reach 150-200m in the directly adjoining hills.[9]

The River Kennet and the Kennet and Avon Canal flow east through the centre of the town to reach the Thames at Reading, while the River Lambourn (beside which is the country's largest horse-training paddocks in the Valley of the Lambourn Downs) partly forms its northern boundary, ending in the town. A tributary that is smaller still, the River Enborne, forms the southern boundary (and also the county boundary with Hampshire). Adjoining the town's south-eastern border is Greenham Common and the famous Newbury Racecourse. Newbury is surrounded on three sides (north, west and south) by the North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The downland to the south rises steeply out of the river valley providing scenic views, including Watership Down (made famous by the novel of the same name), Beacon Hill, the southeast's highest point Walbury Hill, and Combe Gibbet.

Demography

Newbury has two very narrowly buffered settlements, Thatcham (25,267 inh. as at 2011) and Shaw cum Donnington (1,686 inh. as at 2011) forming an identifiable, informal greater Newbury urban and suburban conglomeration. In major use classes 11% of Newbury's land is occupied by roads and as of 2005, 34% of its land was occupied by domestic gardens.

2011 Published Statistics: Population, home ownership and extracts from Physical Environment, surveyed in 2005[10]

Output areaHomes owned outrightOwned with a loanSocially rentedPrivately rentedOtherkm² roadskm² waterkm² domestic gardensUsual residentskm²

Civil parish38164549258924641331.1460.1893.430313319.9

Economy

 

Part of the Vodafone Headquarters

Newbury and its immediate surroundings constitute the major commercial and retail centre of West Berkshire. The local economy is inter-related to that of the eastern M4 corridor which has most of its industrial, logistical and research businesses close to Newbury, Reading and Slough, with smaller industrial estates in the county at Theale, Bracknell and Maidenhead. Newbury is home to the UK headquarters of the mobile network operator Vodafone, which is the town's largest employer with over 6,000 people on staff. Before moving to their £129 million headquarters in the outskirts of the town in 2002, Vodafone used 64 buildings spread across the town centre.[11]

As well as Vodafone, Newbury is also home to the UK headquarters of National Instruments, Micro Focus, Jokers' Masquerade, Stryker Corporation, Snell Advanced Media (formerly Quantel), Cognito and Newbury Building Society. The pharmaceutical company Bayer AG are also headquartered in the town, although in October 2015 the company announced their intention to move to the Green Park Business Park near Reading.[12]

Wedding videography is a video production that documents a wedding on video. The final product of the videographer's documentation is commonly called a wedding video. It is also referred to as a wedding movie or a wedding film.

Small text Wedding videography can trace its roots back to before the advent of the modern video camera through 8mm and 16mm films. When film was the only way to capture moving pictures, a few enterprising individuals would take the family 8mm camera and film the weddings of friends and family. These film cameras had a major limitation in the form of 4-minute load times. After exposing 4 minutes of film, the operator would have to load a new film cartridge. The high cost of processing and the fact the majority of them could not record sound to the film further limited the industry. However, there were still a few individuals who were able to turn the documentation of weddings into a business.

1980 saw the introduction of the first consumer camcorders by Sony, with other manufacturers soon following suit. With the introduction of these first camcorders, wedding video documentation evolved from something only for the rich into something for the masses. Early adopters were primarily hobbyists who at first started recording the weddings of friends and family, then went on to do jobs for pay.

The early days of professional wedding videography were marked by primitive technology and technique, with the equipment generally producing low image quality. Cameras required bright lights, had fuzzy pictures, poor color saturation, and single-channel, poor quality audio. The cameras were bulky, with a separate unit that connected to the video recorder via a cable, severely limiting the videographer's movement. In post-production, many wedding videos were not edited. Generation loss was also a limiting factor because of the nature of analog video tape.

From its earliest days and through the 1980s, wedding videography developed the negative reputation of interfering with the festivities it was meant to document. The bright lights required to produce a quality image were damaging to the atmosphere many brides and grooms wanted to create. As the market expanded, it was flooded by many individuals who had little experience and technical knowledge, which left a negative impression on the clients. Consumer technology available to the wedding videographer also could not equal broadcast quality of the time.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the state of the industry began to improve. Videographers began to form regional and national organizations, the largest, currently active organization being the Wedding and Event Videographers Association International (WEVA). Manufacturers created a market between the professional video camera and video camera consumer levels, known as the prosumer, which met the needs of this niche market. the state of the Towards the mid-1990s, the manufacturers introduced digital cameras, removing the last of the technological barriers that had impeded wedding videography since its inception. The cameras were small, mobile, worked even better than the already good analog cameras on the market in low light situations, and allowed the videographer to be discreet and not an intrusion to the events. These prosumer digital cameras were even adopted by many commercial producers because of their size and the quality of their images.

Post-production creativity took a major leap forward with the introduction of advanced tools like the Newtek Video Toaster in the early 1990s. This led to the introduction of other relatively inexpensive non-linear editing systems (NLE), which offered the editor many more creative options. But the delivery method still relied on an analog viewing system, VHS video tape. This changed in the late 1990s with introduction of the recordable DVD. Weddings and events were now recorded digitally, edited digitally, and delivered digitally, greatly improving the image quality.

By the late 1990s, wedding videography had expanded beyond documentation of weddings. The majority of wedding videographers preferred to add the additional term of "event" to their description of service. New offerings, such as Love Stories, Photo Montages (a retrospective collection of photographs set to music), music videos, family biographies appeared. Anniversaries, Bar and Bat Mitzvahs, graduations, and many other one-time events were also being documented in large numbers on video. The general skill level of the industry's members improved and post-production capabilities reflected the standards of commercial productions. As the industry grew, consumers began to have more options both in the length .